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Introduction

ITALIAN FOLKSONG LYRICS COMPILATION AND FAMILY RECIPES COMPILATION

Compilation and translations © Kenneth A. Mazzer 2011

Italian-American group

Introductory Notes

1. This is a compilation of lyrics for old Italian songs, from many sources. Some were found on the Internet, but mostly I listened to records and dug out the lines word by word, with the help of dictionaries and by asking native speakers. Many non-Italian speakers, like me, enjoy listening to the songs but can only make out a few words. The purpose of this compilation is to dig out a few more words, so that you can enjoy the meaning as well as the tunes.

2. There are thousands of Italian songs, but I limited this compilation to those I actually listened to (many times) and enjoy. Special thanks to Angelo Santin for providing much of the music, and to the late Patsy Diani for playing so many of them for us on his accordion.

3. Of course folk songs come from all over Italy, but most of this compilation is from the north, because those are the ones I grew up hearing sung at picnics and at the Italian-American Cooperative in Clifton, NJ. (But even at, for example, the Lombard picnics, southern songs like “Oe Mari” were included in the songfests.) I included a few from central Italy. Most of the songs from the south that I know are Neapolitan standards or more modern canzone, not folksongs. They are famous, the composers are known, and the lyrics are readily available from many sources. So it is not necessary to include them here. I just do not know the folksongs from the south, so they are not included (for now). One exception is “Luna Mezzo ‘o Mare” (a/k/a C’è la Luna, Salsiccia e Baccalà, etc.) because we all know that tune, and by now it is an anonymous folksong. There are many versions and dialects of that song; I just wrote down a few. (And later I added a few more Southern favorites.)

4. Your first reaction, after listening to about 30 seconds of some northern songs, may be to hit the “stop” button. Your impression may be that they are gloomy, repetitive, and boring, especially compared with the famous Neapolitan songs like O Sole Mio, Santa Lucia, Faniculi Fanicula, etc. So here is a primer.

In general:

Southern songs are lyric (moon in June, etc.), about lost love or falling in love. Northern songs are mostly ballads, narrating a story.

Southern songs are sung by one singer (and the ones we hear on records are good). Northern songs are sung by groups (some better than others), with a lot of call-and-response.

Many of the famous southern songs came from annual song contests, going back to the 1700s, so the composers are known. Most of the northern songs I have are “anonymous”, and there are several versions of each.

Southern songs tend to have complex melodies; northern melodies tend to be simple and repetitious.

Southern songs are meant to be sung or listened to for pleasure or for seranades. The northern ones are work songs, drinking songs and marching songs, although many of the ones I have heard have been arranged as waltzes or polkas, for dancing.

The south uses mandolins, the north uses accordions.

Of course, I am talking here about southern “canzone”. There are also plenty of anonymous southern folk songs, not as polished, with bagpipes, penny whistles, a weird instrument that sounds like making farts with your armpit, etc. etc. I just don’t have them (since I never heard them, growing up) but they are on Youtube.

On first hearing, some of the northern songs (especially when sung by an a cappella chorus) may sound sad and gloomy, but often the lyrics are cheery. There are some truly tragic songs included here, such as Povera Emma and Il Tragico Naufragio della Nave Sirio, but on the whole even when the story is about a young girl forced into a nunnery or having to go off to work in the marshes or rice fields, or seeing one’s girlfriend being cremated, there is humor in the words. You get the feeling that once the girl’s father has gotten over his anger the young novice will get to be with her boyfriend again, that the young will carry on, and so on. Even in the worst case, a common attitude is, “Well, if I don’t come back from the war, we will meet in heaven.”

5. I tried to limit the songs to ones no longer under copyright, and used a cut-off date of around 1920; that is, right after World War I (because so many of the most popular songs came from that war). One exception is the famous song La Montanara. It possibly may still be under copyright, although I doubt it. I decided to include it for the reasons specified in the notes to that song. Please inform me if any of these songs are copyrighted and should be removed.

6. Some on-line sources for lyrics and songs include:

http://boulegadis.d-maps.com

http://www.dalmenweb.it

http://wikitesti.com

http://it.wikisource.org

http://www.alpini.torino.it

http://www.analaghio.it

http://www.inilossum.it

http://trentinosvr.blogspot.com

http://www.coromontegrappa.it

http://www.angolotesti.it

http://www.testiecanzoni.it

http://www.lyricsmania.com

http://www.recmusic.org

http://www.lyricstranslate.com

http://www.italianfolkmusic.com

http://www.italyworldclub.com

duomariposa.blogspot.com

7. Note that there are incomplete portions and questions about many of the lyrics. I will be grateful for any suggestions and corrections. What I want to avoid, however, is “correcting” a dialect word into “proper” (standard) Italian. At the same time, though, a note on the translation of an obscure dialect word into standard Italian would be most appreciated. Please send all corrections and comments to anselmo@mindspring.com.

8. At the last minute I decided to add some comments on the songs. I will roughly translate the titles, as best I can. I will add a short summary of the song (necessarily, that will not include many of the best lyrics). And I will give each song a “grade” as to how much I like it, based on the tune as well as the lyrics included here, plus historic value and the like.

9. At the end of each letter of the alphabet there is a family recipe, starting from antipasto on through dessert. One general note: As many Italian-Americans have remarked, a lot of the food they grew or raised in their gardens and served at home is nowadays considered gourmet, or even trendy or effete. But this was and is just everyday fare for working people.

10. At the beginning of some of the lyrics (maybe someday by all of them), and on the home page, you can click on the audio player where you can hear some bars of the melody. These are amateur renditions of the tunes. They may help if you already knew the song but may have forgotten it. If, however, you do not know the song, please do not take this as a measure of its quality. Find a better version on Youtube, iTunes, etc.

11. You can click on a photo to see an enlarged version.

12. Acknowledgments
Special thanks to Therese Cooper, who provided recordings made in 1976 of folksongs sung by her father’s family (Andreoli) and her mother’s family (DellaBella), from the municipality of Samolaco in the province of Sondrio. Therese and her mother also provided confirmation of the lyrics to O Scior Sindich, found in the book Samolaco Oggi E Ieri by Amletto Del Giorgio. Two songs from Samolaco (O Scior Sindich and Sulla Montagna) are now included in this compilation. If we can decipher the lyrics to more of Therese’s songs they will be included, too.

One inspiration for this website was the book Dolomite Legacy: San Vito di Cadore to America (Gateway Press, 2006) by Eileen Menegus Debesis. My grandmother was born in San Vito, and I had learned a bit about the area from my family and from Cadorin gatherings in New Jersey, but Eileens’s book (available on Amazon.com, etc.) provides the history and culture of that region in detail, as well as some stories about the Cadorin who settled in my hometown in New Jersey. Eileen also suggested the addition of a few songs to this compilation, songs that she had sung as a member of a choral group while she was in San Vito, and she kindly confirmed the lyrics.

The Casa Italiana in Washington DC (www.casaitalianaschool.org) is a wonderful resource for Italian language and culture. I thank its president, Dr. Joseph Lupo, and Father Ezio Marchetto, pastor of Holy Rosary Church next door to it, for their kind suggestions and encouragement. I am especially grateful to Flavia Colombo, Assistant Director at Casa Italiana, for her help in transcribing several of the songs (12 so far . . . ) and for her patience with my rudimentary Italian.

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